Last time we dove deep into the world of a little salad bar just a few steps away from the STATWORX office. This time we are going to dig even deeper … well, we are going to dig a little deeper. Today’s Specials are cross-elasticities and the effect of promotions.

We talked so much about salads, because the situation of our little island of semi-healty lunch choices makes for an illustrative case on how we can calculate price elasticities – the measure generally agreed upon by economists to evaluate how any change in price affects demand. Since the intricacies of deriving these price elasticities of demand with regressions are to be the subject of this short blog series, the salad bar was a cheap example.

What we did so far

Specifically, in my last post, we wanted to know how a linear regression function relates to elasticity. It turns out that this depends on how the price and demand variable have been transformed. We explored four different transformations and in the end, we came to the conclusion that the log-log model fits our data best.

This was by no means an accident. Empirical explorations may occasionally guide us in choosing a different direction, but microeconomics arguments are heavily in favor of log-log models. The underlying demand curve describes demand most like economists assume it to behave. This model ensures that demand cannot sink below zero as the price increases; while on the other side, demand exponentially grows as the price decreases. Yet, the deductibility of a constant elasticity value is its most desirable feature. It makes the utilization of elasticity that much simpler.

Granted, if I’m being honest, the real reason the log-log model worked may have to do with the fact that I created the data. This salad vendor does exist, but obviously, they certainly did not fork over their sales data just because I thought their store would make an illustrative example. All the data we worked with was the result of how I imagined this little salad vendor’s market situation to be. Daily sales prices over the past two years were simulated for our little salad bar by randomly selecting prices between a certain price range, then a multiplicative demand function was used to derive sales with some added randomness. And with that we were done simulating the data.

Obviously, this is far from the often messy historical data that one will encounter at retailers or any business that sells anything. There was no consideration of competition, no in-store alternatives, no new promotional activaties, no seasonal-effects, or any of the other business-specific factors that obscure price effects. The relationship between price and demand is usually obfuscated by the many other factors that influence a consumers buying decision. Thus, it is the intricacies of isolating the interfering factors that determines the success of empirical work.

A closer look at the data at hand

To illustrate this I went back to the sales data drawing board and made up some more data. For details, check out the code at our Github page. The results can be seen in the graph below. The graph actually consists of two graphs: a scatter plot that illustrates daily sales quanties over time and a line graph that also describes the price development over time. If one looks more closely at the graph, the development of sales cannot always be explained by just looking at the price. The second half of the year 2014 illustrates this most glaringly. In some cases, sales spikes occur which seem to be unrelated to the product price.

price and sales over time

Additional information is thus needed. Obviously, there is a multitute of possible factors that might explain the discrepancies in the relationship between price and demand. And of course, when offered, we look at anything provided to us in order to evaluate whether we can extract some pricing-relevant insight from it. The two most desired requests concern information about promotional activities and intel on competitor prices. Luckily, we do not have to ask as I simulated the data and integrated it into the previously seen graph (see below). Promotional activities by the salad bar are indicated by thin blue lines across the two graphs and the pricing history of the closest competitor are illustrated in the graph below.

price and sales over time with promotions

Almost surprisingly (though not really), the graph illustrates that both promotions and competitor prices impact the number of salads sold by our small salad bar. If we were now running the same log-log regression, the resulting elasticity score would be skewed.

But how does one include both the promotional data and the competitor price information? There are several fancy ways of doing it, but for now we’ll stick with simple (also often efficient) ways. For the promotional data, we will use a dummy variable – coded one for every day our salad bar turned on its promotions engine and zero otherwise. In reality though, the salad bar’s key promotional tools are an incentive-lacking stamp card and the occasional flyer with some time-limited coupons. The data describes the latter.

The therory of cross price elasticity

To utilize the prices of competitors, we quickly need to delve into some economical theory. Next to price elasticity of demand, there is a second concept called cross price elasticity of demand. The two concepts are as similar, as their names suggest. Just look at the two formulas.

The formula for price elasticity:

    \[epsilon = frac{Delta qty/qty}{Delta price/price}\]

And the formula for cross price elasticity:

    \[epsilon_{C} = frac{Delta qty/qty}{Delta price_{Comp}/price_{Comp}}\]

The only thing that differs is the price with which one calculates. Instead of using the product’s price, one uses the competitors price. Conceptually, however price elasticity and cross price elasticity slightly differ. With cross elasticity scores, it is plausible to get positive scores. However, with elasticity this is highly implausible and almost always indicates omitted variable bias, granted some luxury goods, like iPhones, may be the exception.

However, cross elastities are actually commonly positive. The reason is captured by the terms substitutional goods and complimentary goods. An obvious substiutional good would be a salad from the restaurant next to the salad bar. One eats either at the salad bar or at the restaurant. Thusly, a higher price for the salad at the restaurant could make it more likely that more customers choose to buy at the salad at our salad bar. A higher price at the restaurant would therefore consequently positively impact sales at the salad bar. The according cross elasticity score would be positive.

The influence of competitors

But we can also imagine negative cross elasticity scores. In this case, we are confronted with a complementary product. For example, next to our salad bar is a cute little coffee place. Coffee is perfect at overcoming the after lunch food coma – so many people want one. Unfortunately, the greedy owner of this cute coffee shop just increased her prices – again! Annoying, but not a big problem for us, the restaurant with which our salad bar competes also sells cheap coffee. Now this is a big problem for the salad bar. Their salad and the coffee from cute, but greedy shop are complimentary products. As the coffee price increases, salad sales at our salad bar slow.

In Frankfurt, there are obviously only coffee shops with very reasonably priced coffee, so we stick to just the information about the main competitor. But how to operationalize the competitor price data? The conceptional and mathematical closeness between elasticity and cross elasticity suggests that one could treat them similarly. And indeed, it is good starting point to include competitor prices the same way as the actual product prices, spoiler alert, logged.

Advanced Simple
Estimate Std. Error Estimate Std. Error
Intercept 5.36 0.09 8.43 0.11
Log Price -1.45 0.03 -1.76 0.05
Promo 0.45 0.02
Log Price_{Comp} 1.23 0.03
Adjusted R^2 0.80 0.41

Let’s look at the output in the table above. As I was in full control of the data generation process – and since we know what the underlying elasticity actually was – I set it at -1.5. Obviously, because of the miniscule level of randomness added, both models do reasonably well. Even withstanding R^2 and the standard errors, there is still a clear winner. By ignoring the impact of promotional activities and the competitors prices, the price elasticity estimate of simpler model is biased. Here the difference is relatively small, but with real data, the difference can be substantial or as we omit essential information here systemic.

That is all! In the next blog post in this series, we introduce more complex relationships between price, promotions, competitor pricing, and concepts to utilize the insights for business purposes.

A few hundred meters from our office, there is a little lunch place. It is part of a small chain that specializes in assemble-yourself, ready-to-eat salads. When we moved into our new office a few years ago, this salad vendor quickly became a daily fixture. However, overtime, this changed. We still eat there regularly, but I am certain, if one were to look at their STATWORX – related turnover the trend would not delight management and the question is why?
The answer has a lot to do with the arrival of new competitors, improved cooking skills, elaborate promotions and certainly also pricing. It is the latter – pricing – that will be at the center of this series.

When analyzing pricing related issues, it is often of essential interest to have a measure of how some change in price affects demand. The measure generally agreed upon by economists to describe this relationship is that of price elasticity of demand, epsilon. As a relative measure, it is unit independent, which turns it into a winner. Elasticity is defined as the percent change in quantity divided by percentage change in price:

    \[epsilon = frac{Delta qty/ qty}{Delta price/ price}\]

Conceptually, three conditions are commonly distinguished: elasticity scores of < -1 indicate an ‚elastic demand.‘ This means that if one increases the price by one percent, the quantity of demand decreases by more than one percent. The other two conditions are elasticities of demand > -1, in which case we speak of ‚inelastic demand‘ and the case when elasticity equals -1. This is called ‚unit elastic demand.‘

Being able to deduce the actual price elasticity of demand for our salad bar would be of great help. With a reliable elastic score at hand, we can answer questions like: How many salads can we expect to sell at a given price? How does a price change of 10% affect demand? With this knowledge, it would be possible to utilize one’s pricing as a tool in order to target different salad-business KPIs. Eventually, the salad bar can adjust its price in order to maximize profit or to increase sales – depending on their strategic objectives.

It is the intricacies of deriving this price elasticities of demand with regressions that will be the subject of this short blog. The situation of our salad vendor makes for an illustrative case on how we can calculate price elasticity and how they can be used to adjust one’s pricing strategy.

Setup

To be upfront – although this salad vendor exists, and it is in fact an integral part in the STATWORX food chain – all the data we work with is made up. It describes, how I imagine this little salad vendor’s market situation to be. With each new post, as we examine more complex issues, we will delve deeper into the intricacies of the salad vendor’s world.

The question of this blog post is simple: How can we use linear regression to derive price elasticities? To explore this, we need historic prices and sales information. To begin, there will be no consideration of competition, no in-store alternatives, no new promotional activates, no seasonal-effects, or anything else.

Daily sales prices of the past two years were simulated for our little salad bar by randomly selecting prices between 5.59€ and 9.99€ – clearly not a great pricing strategy, but it suffices for this post’s purposes. A multiplicative demand function was used to derive sales with some randomness added. And with that we are done simulating the data. For more details, check out the code at our Githubpage.

Calculating Elasticity of Demand

We want to know how a linear regression function relates to elasticity. It turns out that this depends on how the variables have been transformed. It is possible to deduce elasticity – a factor of relative of change – in almost any situation. Here you find the four most common transformations.

Transformation Function Elasticity
Level-Level Y = a+bX epsilon=b*frac{X}{Y}
Log-Level log(Y) = a+bX epsilon=b*X
Level-Log Y = a+b*log(X) epsilon=frac{b}{Y}
Log-Log log(Y) = a+b*log(X) epsilon=b

Dependent on the pre-regression variable transformation, different post-regression transformations are necessary in order derive the elasticity scores. The table above shows that in the case of a log-log model, the elasticity is a constant value across the entire demand curve; while in all other cases, it is dependent on the specific current price and/or demand. This means that the choice of the model is indicative of the assumed demand curve. Choosing wrongly results in a misspecified model.

This is great to know, but which model should one use? To evaluate this, I simply ran each of these four models. The results you can find in the table below, but they are nothing like you will ever find in the real world, in that all effects are highly significant and the R^2 is ridiculously high for any social or economic analysis. This is by design as hardly any randomness was added. In addition, the data was setup up in a way that the log-log model was predestined to generate the winning model.

Model Intercept Price Variable varnothing Elasticity R^2
Level-Level 439.58 (3.2) -38.57 (0.42) -2.50 0.84
Log-Level 6.59 (0.01) -0.23 (0.01) -1.63 0.95
Level-Log 671.22 (3.53) -265.66 (1.83) -2.11 0.93
Log-Log 7.86 (0.01) -1.52 (0.01) -1.51 0.97

The argument is not that a log-log model is the best model to derive elasticities. Although, there are strong microeconomics arguments to be made about why the log-log model is the most reasonable model to describe demand elasticity. The underlying demand curve describes demand most like economists assume it to behave. It ensures that demand cannot sink below zero as the price increases and on the other side demand exponentially grows as the price decreases. Yet, the deductibility of a constant elasticity value, as aforementioned, is its most desirable feature. This fact makes it much easier to apply elasticity to optimize pricing.

Still, empirical analysis might guide us to assume other price-demand relationships. The graphic below shows this in an illustrative way. The legend of the graph orders the models in increasing order of fit. Looking at each graph, it becomes clear why the level-log model fares better than the level-level model, and why the log-level model outperforms the level-log model and so on. The non-linear relationship between price and demand that we introduced by relying a multiplicative demand curve is best described by the log-log model. Had I used an additive demand curve the ranking would have been the other way around. Thus, the argument is that under certain circumstances the model choice can have a significant impact.

elasticity regression comp

For the application in practice we have to be very aware of the functional form that is indicated by the regression we chose. The effects can have severe consequences. The elasticity with which the data was generated was -1.5. In order to illustrate the effect that model choice can have on the estimated elasticity, I calculated average elasticities for level-level, log-levvel and level-level models and compared it with the price coefficient of the log-log model. This is a bit of an oversimplification, but the point still stands: The results are substantially different, which has consequences when one tries to utilize the deducted elasticities. Yet, based on the graphical analysis and the model information, we would come to the conclusion that the log-log fares best, so we can proceed as theory would want us to.

Price Optimalization

Before we finish, let’s quickly look at how we can use elasticity to improve the little salad vendor’s erratic pricing strategy (my random daily price change). For this we need to know the salad bar’s cost function. Luckily, we do: it has fix costs of about 300€ for every day it is open. The preparation of a single salad costs about 2.50€ per salad. The cost function is thus:

    \[€€TotalCost = 300€ + SaladesSold * 2.50€\]

Microeconomic theory teaches us that fix costs do not matter when calculating elasticity based margin optimized prices. I’ll spare you the details, but the function to calculate the optimized price eventually states:

    \[OptimalPrice = frac{Elasticity*CostPerSalad}{1+Elasticity}\]

Applying the elasticity derived from the log-log model, this results in a proposed optimized price that lies somewhere between 7.21€ and 7.47€. The estimation is 7.34€. Instead of daily changing its price randomly, it is best to stick to prices in this range. The salad vendor can expect to sell around 125 Salads each day, ensuring a daily profit of between 287€ and 320€.

KPIs Lowerbound Elasticity Exp. Elasticity Upperbound Elasticity
Elasticity -1.51 -1.52 -1.54
Opt. Price 7.43€ 7.30€ 7.17€
Quantity 126 125 125
Profit 319€ 302€ 285€

This is a daring statement. With the actual example data the conclusion would be fine. But in practice such perfect regression results, with so little uncertainty, are unrealistic. And this is where it tends to get tricky. To illustrate this point, I adjusted the standard error from almost nonexistent to 0.15. The results should still be highly significant, but looking at the table below one would be surprised about the consequences of such small changes.

KPIs Lowerbound Elasticity Exp. Elasticity Upperbound Elasticity
Elasticity -1.23 -1.52 -1.82
Opt. Price 13.51€ 7.30€ 5.57€
Quantity 106 125 114
Profit 864€ 302€ 51€

The certainty with which we proposed the optimal price was very much unfounded. In this example, the range for elasticity still is relatively small despite the increased uncertainty. Yet, the resulting price range for the ideal price is between 5.58€ and 13.73€, which is not a very precise proposal. The price range actually exceeds the highest price that the little salad vendor ever dared to set. The consequences are severe: the resulting profit varies almost sixteen-fold between the highest and lowest prices.

To state the obvious, the illustrated approach to elasticity calculations is just the tip of the iceberg. Meaning that we need to invest time into improving the current approach. The next posts will focus on intervening factors like promotional activities and similar products.

Wie kann man Preiselastizität bestimmen? Die Antwort auf diese Frage ist nicht eindeutig, sondern fallspezifisch. Es gibt viele Verfahren, um Preiselastizität empirischzu bestimmen. DirekteExpertenbefragungen, Kundenbefragungen, indirekte Kundenbefragungen durch Conjoint Analysen und vielfältige experimentelle Testmethoden.

Wenn die Datenlage es erlaubt, wenden wir Methoden an, die auf historischen Marktdaten basieren. Unterfüttert mit Daten zu Faktoren, wie Wettbewerbspreise, Werbeinformationen etc., lassen sich hier durch am erfolgreichsten die entscheidenden Wirkungsmechanismen für eine dynamische und automatisierte Preisgestaltung identifizieren.

In drei Blogposts sollen die verschiedenen Verfahren beleuchtet und ihre Vor- und Nachteile aufbereitet werden. Im vergangen ersten Teil wurden befragungsbasierten Verfahrenbesprochen. In diesem zweiten Teil wird der Fokus auf experimentellen Methoden und Conjoint Analysen liegen. Im darauf folgenden und abschließenden Post sollen gängige regressionsbasierte Verfahren Thema sein.

Die im vorherigen Blogbeitrag beschrieben Expertenbefragungen und direkte Kundenbefragungen sind in vielerlei Hinsicht schwierig. Experteninterviews vernachlässigen systematisch die Kundenperspektive. Kundenbefragungen sind inhaltlich problematisch, da sie fast zwingend eine isolierte Fokussierung auf die Preissetzung bewirken. Dies steht im Widerspruch zum eigentlichen Kaufprozess, der viel wahrscheinlicher einer Kosten-Nutzen-Abwägung entspricht.

Indirekte Verfahren

Um diesen Problemen auszuweichen, wird daher häufig auf indirekte Befragungsmethoden zurückgegriffen. Durch indirekte Befragungsverfahren sollen die Kaufsituation und die Kundenentscheidung realistischer abgebildet werden, als dies durch Befragungen möglich ist. Ein zentrales Konzept sind dabei Conjoint Analyse Verfahren. Conjoint Analysen sind ein zentrales und etabliertes Marketinginstrument mit vielfältigen auf die jeweilige Problemstellung zugeschnittene Varianten.

Grundsätzlich sollen Conjoint Analysen dabei helfen, die tatsächlichen Abwägungen und Präferenzen von Kunden zwischen verschiedenen Bedürfnissen besser nachzuvollziehen. Durch ein umfassenderes Verständnis der Kundenpräferenzen sollen dann Rückschlüsse auf die konkrete Fragestellung abgeleitet werden. Prinzipiell können so durch Conjoint Analysen vielfältige und komplexe Fragestellungen beantwortet werden.

Um die Zahlungsbereitschaft von Kunden abzufragen, werden Kunden z.B. verschiedene sogenannte Produkt-Preis-Profile zur Auswahl gestellt. Die verschiedenen Auswahlmöglichkeiten unterscheiden sich hinsichtlich im Voraus definierter Merkmale und bzgl. des Preises. Die Teilnehmer sind aufgefordert, zwischen diesen Alternativen zu wählen und Ihre Präferenzen darzulegen. Basierend auf diesen Präferenzaussagen werden die Wirkungen des Preises und der verschiedenen Produktmerkmale herausgearbeitet.

Der Erfolg von Conjoint Verfahren hängt wesentlich von den vorbereitenden Schritten bei der Produkt-Preis-Profi-Gestaltung ab. Eine Vielzahl von Entscheidungen müssen getroffen werden, z.B.:

  • Wie viele verschiedene Merkmale sollen verglichen werden? Dies ist nicht trivial, denn es kann schnell unübersichtlich werden. Entscheidet man sich für nur 3 Merkmale mit jeweils 3 Ausprägungen, so konfrontiert man den Konsumenten bereits mit bis zu 27 Alternativen. Wollte man hier mit Paarvergleichen arbeiten, dann müsste sich der Teilnehmer theoretisch durch 351 Paarvergleich arbeiten. In der Praxis werden natürlich
  • Wie viele Ausprägungen sollen je Merkmal auswählbar sein? Studien zu Folge werden Produkte mit mehr Auswahlmöglichkeiten von Teilnehmern als wichtiger erachtet. Es gibt viele ähnliche Beispiele dafür wie das Testdesign das Ergebnis beeinflusst. Problematisch wird dies, wenn die Wirkung des Testdesigns den tatsächlichen Kaufprozess entstellt.
  • Wie sollen den Teilnehmern die verschiedenen Alternativen präsentiert werden? Sollen alle Alternativen mit ihren unterschiedlichen Preisen gleichzeitig präsentiert werden (Vollprofile) oder sind Paarvergleiche besser? Vollprofile sind realitätsnäher, aber konfrontieren den Teilnehmer mit einer komplexeren Problemstellung, wodurch evtl. keine klaren Ergebnisse abgeleitet werden können.

Der Anwender von Conjoint Verfahren wird mit der komplexen Anforderungspalette konfrontiert, der man bei Experimenten oder bei der Fragebogenausgestaltung ebenfalls begegnet. Dennoch sind Conjoint Analysen ein beliebtes und häufig angewandtes Verfahren. Insbesondere Computergestützte Methoden helfen inzwischen die Komplexität zu reduzieren.

Ähnlich wie die anderen bereits beschriebenen Verfahren sind Conjoint-Analysen kein Instrument, das für ein fortlaufendes systematisches Elastizitäts-Monitoring geeignet ist. Conjoint Verfahren können für explorative Analysen, z.B. im Fall von Produktneueinführungen, ein sehr nützliches Instrument darstellen. Gilt es aber ein fortlaufendes, reaktives Preisgestaltungsinstrument zu entwickeln, so wird das Verfahren an seine Grenzen stoßen, insbesondere dann, wenn man ein breites Produktsortiment hat.

Experimente

Bei Experimenten werden Kunden(-Gruppen) in realen oder nachgestellten Kaufsituationen (Feld-bzw. Laborexperimente) verschiedene Preisalternativen vorgegeben. Aus dem Kaufverhalten der Testteilnehmer werden Rückschlüsse bzgl. des Effektes des Preises auf den Absatz abgeleitet. Ähnlich wie bei Conjoint Analysen gibt es bei der Ausgestaltung solcher Tests viele Vorgehensmöglichkeiten. Insbesondere der E-Commerce bietet vielfältige Anwendungsmöglichkeiten, da viele zusätzliche transaktionsspezifische Informationen bei der statistischen Auswertung des Experiments hinzugezogen werden können. Doch auch im Brick-And-Mortar-Bereich können durch klassische Store-Tests wichtige Rückschlüsse auf produktspezifische Zahlungsbereitschaften gewonnen werden.

Letztlich gibt es fast keine Grenzen bei der Ausgestaltung von preisbezogenen Experimenten, insbesondere dann, wenn auch Laborexperimente in Frage kommen. Hier stellt sich immer die Frage nach der externen Validität dieser Experimente. Künstliche Situationen können atypisches Verhalten verursachen. Ebenso kann es schwierig sein, aus den Erkenntnissen des Experiments praxisrelevante Schlüsse zu ziehen.

Ebenfalls problematisch sind die hohen Kosten, die mit Experimenten einhergehen. Insbesondere mit Feldexperimenten greift man direkt in das aktive Geschäft ein. Jede Preissenkung kann mit Profitverlust einhergehen, jede Preiserhöhung kann Absatzverluste bedeuten.

In unseren Projekten mit Kunden nutzen wir Feldexperimente als Validierungswerkzeug für unsere auf Marktdaten basierten Analyseverfahren. Modellgesteuerte Feldexperimente können genutzt werden, um die Prognosegüte eines Modells zu evaluieren und dessen Schwächen aufzudecken.

Alle bisher beschriebenen Verfahren haben ihre Funktion und können bei entsprechenden Rahmenbedingungen sinnvoll und richtig sein. Wenn die Datenlage es aber erlaubt, wenden wir Methoden an, die auf historischen Marktdaten basieren. Im abschließenden Post sollen gängige regressionsbasierte Verfahren Thema sein.

Wie kann man Preiselastizität bestimmen? Die Antwort auf diese Frage ist nicht eindeutig, sondern fallspezifisch. Es gibt viele Verfahren, um Preiselastizität empirisch zu bestimmen. Direkte Expertenbefragungen, Kundenbefragungen, indirekte Kundenbefragungen durch Conjoint Analysen und vielfältige experimentelle Testmethoden.

Wenn die Datenlage es erlaubt, wenden wir Methoden an, die auf historischen Marktdaten basieren. Unterfüttert mit Daten zu Faktoren, wie Wettbewerbspreise, Werbeinformationen etc., lassen sich hierdurch am erfolgreichsten die entscheidenden Wirkungsmechanismen für eine dynamische und automatisierte Preisgestaltung identifizieren.

In drei Blogposts sollen die verschiedenen Verfahren beleuchtet und ihre Vor- und Nachteile aufbereitet werden. Der heutige erste Teil beginnt mit befragungsbasierten Verfahren. Der zweite wird sich mit experimentellen Methoden und Conjoint Analysen beschäftigen. Im darauf folgenden und abschließenden Post sollen gängige regressionsbasierte Verfahren Thema sein.

Expertenbefragungen

Der auf Befragungen basierende Methodenbereich gliedert sich in Expertenbefragungen und verschiedene Verfahren der Kundenbefragung. Wir beginnen mit Expertenbefragungen. Dabei werden Fachleute mit umfassendem Wissen über den Markt oder ein spezielles Marktsegment, in dem das Unternehmen agiert, zur Preiswirkung befragt. Naheliegende Ansprechpartner sind vertriebsnahe Manager, Mitarbeitern aus dem Vertrieb oder Marketing, aber auch externe Fachleute und Berater. Methodisch kann zwischen unstrukturierten, freien Interviews und strukturierten, häufig Workshop basierten, in klare Vorgehensschritte untergliederte Verfahren gewählt werden.

Expertenbefragungen sind in der Regel günstiger und weniger zeitintensiv als Kundenbefragungen. In der Hoffnung, dass Fachleute markttransformierende Ereignisse früher und besser erkennen als andere Verfahren, werden Expertenbefragungen gelegentlich auch unterstützend zu anderen Methoden durchgeführt.

Ein Vorteil von Expertenbefragungen ist, dass sie auch in Momenten hoher Ungewissheit zu Ergebnissen führen. Vollständig unerprobter Preisstrategien oder neue Marktsituationen durch neue Wettbewerber oder veränderte Kundenbedürfnisse sind in der Regel nur mit Hilfe von Expertenurteilen abzubilden. Unklar ist aber, welchen Wert diese Ergebnisse haben, denn der mit unbekannten Situationen einhergehenden Unsicherheit sind auch die Experten ausgesetzt.

Darüber hinaus kämpfen Expertenbefragungen mit einer Reihe von Problemen: Es gelingt durch sie nicht, die Kundenperspektive mit einzubeziehen. Außerdem können Experten als Folge von systematisch falschen Annahmen oder lange gültigen, aber veralteten,Paradigmen falsche Schlüsse ziehen. Experten kommen außerdem häufig zu stark divergierenden Prognosen, die dann schwer vereinbar sind.

Insgesamt gilt, dass Expertenbefragungen für ein fortlaufendes Elastizitäten-Monitoring eher ungeeignet sind. Andere analytische Verfahren sind in höherer Frequenz und größerem Umfang durchführbar. In schnelllebigen Marktumfeldern oder für Akteure mit großen Produktsortimenten sind dies entscheidende Nachteile von Expertenbefragungen.

Kundenbefragungen

Bei direkten Befragungen werden Kunden durch Fragen wie „Zu welchem Preis würden Sie dieses Produkt gerade noch kaufen?“ zu ihrer Zahlungsbereitschaft befragt. Die Angaben werden genutzt, um Elastizitätswerte abzuleiten. Durch eine bewusste Fragekonstruktion oder eine gezielte Abfolge können zusätzliche Sachverhalte abgefragt werden. Die ergänzende Frage: „Ab welchem Preisunterschied würden Sie von Produkt X zu Produkt Y wechseln?” erlaubt beispielsweise die gezielte Abfrage von Kreuzelastizitäten zwischen spezifischen Substituten.

Direkte Befragungen sind in vielerlei Hinsicht schwierig. Insbesondere im Kontext von Konsumgütern mit einer Vielzahl an Produkten und Alternativen wird das Abfragen von Zahlungsbereitschaften aufwendig. Inhaltlich problematisch ist die fast zwingend isolierte Fokussierung auf die Preissetzung. Dies steht im Widerspruch zum eigentlichen Kaufprozess, der viel wahrscheinlicher einer Kosten-Nutzen-Abwägung entspricht. Studien weisen auch auf eine Diskrepanz zwischen tatsächlichem und in Umfragen bekundeten Verhalten hin.

Um diesen Problemen auszuweichen, wird daher häufig auf indirekte Befragungsmethoden in Form von Conjoint Analyse oder experimentelle Testdesigns zurückgegriffen. Durch diese Verfahren sollen die Kaufsituation und die Kundenentscheidung realistischer abgebildet werden, als dies durch Befragungen möglich ist. Diese alternativen Verfahren sind Thema des nächsten Beitrags.

Preiselastizität ist die praktikabelste und aussagekräftigste Metrik, um die im Preismanagement entscheidende Frage zu beantworten: Wie reagieren Kunden auf eine Preiserhöhung/Preissenkung um x Prozent? Auf der Basis dieser Kennzahl ist es möglich ein differenziertes Preismanagement aufzubauen. Immer im Blick: der Kunde.

Leider ist der Weg hinzu belastbaren Elastizitätswerten steinig. Es gibt in der Praxis viele Fallstricke und Besonderheiten, die, wenn nicht angemessen berücksichtigt, große Ungenauigkeiten bei der Bestimmung von Preiselastizität verursachen. Die Folge können folgenschwere Fehleinschätzungen sein. Diese Fallstricke aufzuzeigen ist das Ziel dieser Blog-Beitragsserie. Der Schwerpunkt dieses Beitrags liegt auf der Frage: Welche Faktoren beeinflussen auf welche Weise die Preiselastizität?

Viele intervenierende Einflussfaktoren

Auf die Beziehung zwischen Preis und Absatz wirken alle Aspekte des Verkaufsprozesses und des Marktes hinein. Die Zahl möglicher Einflussfaktoren und Wirkungszusammenhänge ist so groß und vielfältig, dass die Suche nach Vollständigkeit nicht zielführend sein kann. Es gibt keine Checkliste, die, wenn gewissenhaft abgearbeitet, garantiert, dass nun alle wichtigen Faktoren berücksichtigt wurden und dadurch robuste Elastizitätswerte abgeleitet werden können.

Preis-Absatz Schema

Um die Vielfältigkeit der Einflussfaktoren aufzuzeigen, habe ich hier eine Auswahl von häufig genannten Einflüssen bereitgestellt:

  • Informationen zu der Zahl der Wettbewerber, ihrer Relevanz, ihrer Preise und ihre Werbeaktionen
  • Informationen zu den eigenen Werbemaßnahmen: Welche Werbemaßnahmen gibt es? Was war Ihre Laufzeit? Wie wirken sich die Maßnahmen auf die Preisgestaltung aus (Couponaktionen etc.)? Sind die Maßnahmen individualisiert oder gemeingültig?
  • Informationen zum Standort: Online oder Offline? Alleinstehen oder in einem Einkaufszentrum? Stadt oder Land?
  • Informationen zu Konkurrenz- und Komplementärprodukten
  • Markeninformationen
  • Feiertage, Saisonalität und ggf. Informationen zu den Wochentagen, zu dem Zeitpunkt des Verkaufs oder gar zum Wetter bzw. zu Wettervorhersagen die zum Verkaufszeitpunkt galten

Es ist weder praktikabel noch möglich alle diese Faktoren in eine Modellierung zu integrieren. Hinzukommt, dass viele diese Faktoren in komplexen Wirkungszusammenhänge mit Preis und Absatz stehen. Zwei Beispiele sollen veranschaulichen, welche Komplexität schon mit der Modellierung einer einzelner Faktoren einhergehen kann:

Marken

Marken sind eines der zentralsten Marketinginstrumente. Erfolgreich umgesetzt, steigern Marken die Kundenloyalität und dienen Kunden als Qualitätsstandards. Diese Aspekte wirken in die Preissetzung hinein. Für etablierte Marken/Markenprodukte ist zu erwarten, dass die Kundereaktionen auf Preisveränderungen weniger stark ausfallen als beispielsweise bei Eigenmarken von Handelsketten. Unsere Praxiserfahrung bestätigt diese Annahme nur bedingt. Zwar haben Markenprodukte in der Regel höhere Preise als andere Produkte, doch insbesondere für Retailer leitet sich dadurch noch keine erhöhte Preisgestaltungsfreiheit ab. Markenprodukte werden von Kunden aktiver und bewusster recherchiert. In Märkten mit hoher Markttransparenz sind daher für Markenprodukte erhebliche Preisveränderungsreaktionen zu beobachten.

Produktlebenszyklus

Die wissenschaftliche Literatur kommt bei der Frage wie sich der Produktlebenszyklus auf Preiselastizität auswirkt zu ambivalente Aussagen. Die Annahmen bezüglich der Wirkungsweise von Produktlebenszyklen sind vielfältige. Ein neues Produkt mag relevante Vorteile mit sich bringen, so dass Kunden erst dann ein Preisbewusstsein entwickeln, wenn es entsprechende Konkurrenzprodukte gibt. Zur Zeit der Produkteinführung ist also eine geringe Preiselastizität vorzufinden, die mit der Zeit steigt. Andererseits lassen sich ebenso Produktkategorien finden die eine starke Produktdifferenzierung erfahren haben. Die Folge sind eine gesteigerte Kundenbindung und damit fast zwingend eine geringere Preiselastizität.

Insbesondere für Handelsunternehmen mit einem diversen Produktportfolio kann der Aspekt Produktlebenszyklus ein schwer zu überblickender Aspekt bei der Elastizitäten-Bestimmung sein. Dies bedeutet aber nicht, dass der Produktlebenszyklus unwichtig ist. Es bedeutet aus unserer Sicht nur, dass Produktlebenszyklen auf Grund ihrer vielfältigen potentiellen Wirkungsdynamiken ein analytisch anspruchsvoll zu erfassendes Konstrukt sind.

Welche Faktoren sollte man berücksichtigen?

Eine vollständige Liste aller möglichen Faktoren, die relevant sein können kenne ich nicht. Es kann sie auf Grund der Komplexität der Aufgabe und der vielfältigen Märkte auch nicht geben. Es gibt aber dennoch ein paar wichtige Orientierungspunkte, die hilfreich sein können. Abschließend daher ein paar Richtlinien:

  • Zielsetzung der Analyse: Wichtig ist es, im Voraus Klarheit über die Zielsetzungen zu schaffen mit der Elastizität bestimmt werden sollen. Geht es darum Elastizitäten für einzelne Produkt zu bestimmen oder für eine Marke? Wird eine Basis-Elastizität für ein Produkt gesucht oder geht es um Elastizitäten in speziellen Verkaufssituation wie etwa im Rahmen von Werbemaßnahme? Je nach Wunsch leiten sich unterschiedliche Minimalbedarfe bezüglich der zu berücksichtigenden Faktoren ab.
  • Datenverfügbarkeit: Ein offensichtliches, manchmal etwas ernüchterndes, aber sehr wichtiges Auswahlkriterium ist die Datenverfügbarkeit. Es ist ein hilfreicher Schritt sich am Anfang einen zumindest oberflächlichen Überblick über die verfügbaren Daten zu verschaffen. Häufig grenzt sich allein dadurch schon die Zahl der verwertbaren Variablen ein. Gleichzeitig kann dieser Schritt eine Quelle für viele neue und relevante Features sein. Dieser Punkt muss keinesfalls ernüchternd sein, sondern kann Anstoßpunkt für viele kreative Ideen werden.
  • Geschäftsfeld: In welchem Geschäftsfeld bewegt sich der Kunde und welche Charaktermerkmale machen seine Produkte aus? Handelt es sich um Business-to-Business oder Business-To-Consumer Transaktionen? Handelt es sich um kurzlebige Verbrauchsgüter oder langlebige Gebrauchsgüter? Handelt es sich bei dem Verbrauschgut um ein leicht lagerbares Gut oder eines das schnell verfällt? Der Austausch mit dem jeweiligen Projektpartner ist hier immer einer der ersten Arbeitsschritte. Hier liegt die Expertise.

Preismanagement ist in den vergangenen Jahren zunehmend in den Fokus von Geschäftsführungen gerückt(1). Verbunden ist diese Entwicklung mit der Hoffnung, mit gezielter Preisgestaltung einen zentralen, aber vernachlässigten Profittreiber identifiziert zu haben. Tatsächlich bestätigen Experten, dass Preismanagement in der Vergangenheit häufig unter unzureichender Aufmerksamkeit gelitten hat (2,4). Unterentwickelte Preissetzungsexpertise und ausbaufähige Preisstrategien sind die Folge.

Die Bedeutung vom richtigen Preismanagement

Preise haben einen stärkeren Einfluss auf den Absatz als die meisten anderen Faktoren. Glaubt man entsprechenden Studien, haben Preissetzungsmaßnahmen eine erheblich stärkere Wirkungskraft als etwaige Steigerungen des Werbebudgets oder als Investitionen ins Vertriebspersonal(3). Preismanagement kann eine solche Wirkungskraft deshalb entfalten, weil Preisänderungen einen direkten und beinahe sofortigen Einfluss auf Umsatz, Absatz und Gewinn haben – dies ohne dabei zwingenderweise Veränderungen der Prozesse und Strukturen eines Unternehmens zu erfordern.

Abbildung Preiselastizität

Unstrittig ist, dass Preismanagement das wohl sensibelste Instrument im Marketing-Werkzeugkasten eines Unternehmens ist. Anders als es durch eine neue Werbekampagne, Maßnahmen zur Kosteneinsparung oder gar innovative Veränderungen am Produkt möglich ist, erlauben z.B. Preissetzungsmaßnahmen eine beinahe unmittelbare Reaktion auf veränderte Marktsituationen. Und – auch das zeigen Studien – beim Kaufverhalten des Kunden stellt sich die Wirkung einer Preisveränderung schneller ein als es bei Werbemaßnahmen oder Produktneueinführungen der Fall ist (4). Darin liegen Risiko und Chance gleichermaßen.

Multi-Channel-Marketing und Vertrieb haben die Bedeutung des Preisemanagements in den vergangenen Jahren noch einmal potenziert. Kunden, Produzenten und Retailer befinden sich in einem merkwürdigen Limbo: Zum einen bietet das Internet Kunden nie zuvor dagewesene Möglichkeiten zum Preisvergleich und damit verbunden eine hohe Preistransparenz. Auf der anderen Seite bietet es Produzenten und Retailern durch differenzierte Marktinformationen und dynamische Preissetzungsstrategien bisher ungeahnte Möglichkeiten der Preisdifferenzierung. Die Vielschichtigkeit des Themas, die Fülle an ungenutzten Daten und Informationen und die dadurch wachsende Bedeutung von professionellem Preismanagements sind es, die so viele Kunden motivieren, an uns heranzutreten. Gemeinsam mit Ihnen entwickeln wir Analytics-Ansätze und bestimmen Metriken, mit denen Sie ein informationsgesteuertes Preismanagement entwickeln können.

Preiselastizität der Nachfrage

Regelmäßig fällt dabei der Fokus auf das Thema Preiselastizität der Nachfrage. Dieses Interesse an Preiselastizität hat, wie die Abb. 1(5) zeigt, seinen guten Grund: Preis und Marksituation bedingen zusammen mit den jeweiligen Produktmerkmalen das Verkaufsvolumen und damit alle anderen wesentlichen Geschäftskennzahlen. Dabei beschreibt Preiselastizität die praktikabelste und aussagekräftigste Metrik, um die im Preismanagement entscheidende Frage zu beantworten: Wie reagieren Kunden auf eine Preisehöhung/Preissenkung um x Prozent? Damit ist die entscheidende Komponente, die es beim Preismanagement zu verstehen gilt, der Kunde.

Das Maß der Preiselastizität reduziert die Frage bzgl. der Kundenreaktion auf eine einfach interpretierbare Kennzahl. Konkret beschreibt Preiselastizität der Nachfrage die relative Veränderung des Absatzes in Folge einer relativen Veränderung des Preises. Zum Beispiel: Ein Unternehmen erhöht seinen Preis um 10%. Sinkt der Absatz in der Folge ebenfalls um 10%, spricht man von einer Preiselastizität von -1. Sinkt der Absatz um 20%, so liegt die Elastizität bei -2. Dies ist intuitive und klar. Auf der Basis dieser Kennzahl ist es möglich ein differenziertes Preismanagement aufzubauen. Preiselastizität erlaubt es Entscheidungsträgern, Produkte miteinander zu vergleichen. In Kombination mit belastbaren Kosteninformationen bildet Preiselastizität die Grundlage für profit-optimale Preisbestimmung. Diese herausragende Stellung verdankt Preiselastizität u. a. ihrer „Dimensionsfreiheit“ (5). Preiselastizitätskennzahlen können über Marken, Produktgruppen, Kunden und Märkte hinweg verglichen werden. Dies legt die Grundlage für eine detaillierte Marktsegmentierung.

Wir haben in den vergangenen Jahren vielfältige Erfahrung mit dem Bestimmen von Preiselastizitäten anhand von Marktdaten gesammelt. Im Rahmen dieser Projekte galt es, das Informationspotential der Daten unserer Kunden so zu nutzen, dass es als Grundlage für die Verbesserung der Preisstrategie diente. Bei der Aufarbeitung der Daten rücken wir zwei Fragen in den Mittelpunkt:

  • Welche Faktoren beeinflussen auf welche Weise Preiselastizität?
  • Wie können wir Preiselastizität so bestimmen, dass sie um störende Einflussfaktoren und potentielle Messfehler bereinigt ist?

Diskussionsanstoß

Die Lösung ist keinesfalls trivial. Es wurden in der Empirie viele Fallstricke und Besonderheiten identifiziert, die, wenn nicht angemessen berücksichtigt, große Ungenauigkeiten bei der Bestimmung von Preiselastizität und daraus resultierende Fehleinschätzungen verursachen. Auch wenn man zu dem Thema eine umfassende, wenn auch kontroverse Literatur, vorfindet, so ist sie für die Lösung vieler Fragen unabdingbar und hilft beim Entdecken des richtigen Vorgehens. Doch die Praxis zeigt, dass die theoretischen Erkenntnisse die konkreten Bedürfnisse des Kunden nicht ausreichend und spezifisch genug erfüllen können. Die Daten, mit denen wir arbeiten, sind kundenspezifisch und jeder Auftrag stellt neue, individuelle Herausforderungen, für die es in der Wissenschaft keine fertigen Lösungen gibt.

In den kommenden Monaten soll es daher an dieser Stelle um die verschiedenen Aspekte und Herausforderungen gehen, die mit der Bestimmung und Anwendung der Preiselastizität zur Steuerung der Nachfrage einhergehen. Wir werden verschiedene Methoden und ihre Vor- und Nachteile diskutieren. Wie werden besprechen, wie man welche Einflussfaktoren berücksichtigen kann und welchen Einfluss sie haben. Und wir werden diskutieren, wie man die Ergebnisse nutzen kann, um daraus Business-Tools zu entwickeln, die ein besseres Preismanagement ermöglichen. An dieser Stelle wird es um die oben beschriebenen grundsätzlichen Ansätze und Konzepte gehen. Vielleicht werden auch Sie dazu motiviert, mehr aus Ihren Daten herauszuholen.

Referenzen

  1. Simon-Kucher & Partner (2016). Global Pricing Study 2016. Bonn.
  2. Rekettye, G. (2011). The increasing importance of pricing. In: Hetsi, E., Kürtösi, Zs. (eds), The diversity of research at the Szeged Institute of Business Studies. Szeged: JATEPress, 13-22
  3. Albers, S., Mantrala, M.K., Sridar, S. (2010). Personal Selling Elasticites: A Meta Analysis. Journal of Marketing Research, 47(5), 840-853.
  4. Simon, H., Fassnacht M. (2016). Preismanagement: Strategie, Analyse, Entscheidung, Umsetzung. (Auf. 4). Wiesbaden: Springer Gabler
  5. Friedel. E. (2014). Price Elasticity: Research on Magnitude and Determinants. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang

Eine Hypothese ist eine empirisch überprüfbare Annahme über die Wirkungsbeziehung von zwei oder mehr Faktoren der realen und erfahrbaren Welt. Am Anfang eines jeden Forschungsprojektes stehen, außer einer klaren Fragestellung, die das Forschungsvorhaben leitet, stets auch eine oder mehrere Hypothesen. Erst dadurch kann eine systematische Forschungsarbeit gewährleistet werden.

Übersicht zu Hypothesen

Im Verlauf des Forschungsprojektes gilt es, die Richtigkeit der Hypothesen zu überprüfen. Die Hypothesen müssen also so formuliert sein, dass sie durch eine methodische Sammlung von geeigneten Daten und durch die anschließende systematische Auswertung der Daten auch tatsächlich falsifizierbar sind. Das heißt, die vermuteten Wirkungszusammenhänge der Hypothese sollen sich am Ende als reale Wirkungszusammenhänge erweisen und als plausible Erklärung für beobachtete Phänomene dienen.

Es ist also von großer Bedeutung, richtige Hypothesen zu erstellen und dieser wichtigen und komplexen „Vorarbeit“ der Forschung große Aufmerksamkeit und genügend Zeit zu widmen. Hypothesenbildung ist alles andere als eine lästige oder anspruchslose Pflichterfüllung. Gute und qualitativ hochwertige Hypothesenbildung ist eine echte Herausforderung und stellt eine wichtige Voraussetzung für am Ende wirksam nutzbare Ergebnisse dar.

In unseren Workshops und Projektberatungen stellen wir immer wieder fest, dass vielversprechende Studien und Forschungsprojekte bereits in diesem frühen Stadium der Hypothesenbildung ins Schleudern geraten. Auch wenn es uns vielfach durch Improvisationsgeschick und Erfahrung gelingt, Studienvorhaben unserer Kunden trotz mangelhafter Hypothesenbildung vor dem Entgleisen zu bewahren, so bleibt der gelegentliche „Totalschaden“ leider nicht aus.

Falsche Hypothesen können gravierende Folgefehler verursachen. Unbedachte Formulierungen können Hypothesen zu nicht überprüfbaren Theoriesackgassen werden lassen. Aufwendig gesammelte Daten können nichtig werden, weil bei der Hypothesenerstellung unbedacht vorgegangen wurde. Spannende und vielversprechende Forschungsprojekte dürfen nicht an ihren ungenauen oder falschen Hypothesen scheitern. Dies lässt sich recht leicht vermeiden!

In einer kleinen 5-schrittigen Anleitung wollen wir dir deshalb helfen, die größten Hürden bei der eigenständigen Hypothesenbildung zu nehmen. Ziel dieses Guides ist es, dich mit zentralen und realistischen Standards vertraut zu machen, dir pragmatische Lösungswege anzubieten, und dir ein grundlegendes Handwerkszeug für die effiziente Hypothesenbildung zur Verfügung zu stellen:

Schritt 1 – Bestimme die relevanten Variablen frühzeitig

Kläre, für welche Faktoren du dich interessierst. Überlegen dir sorgfältig, wie diese Faktoren am besten mit Daten dargestellt werden können. Lege für die zukünftige statistische Auswertung fest, welcher Faktor durch welche Variable im Datensatz repräsentiert werden soll. Es werden nur diese Faktoren in der statistischen Analyse berücksichtigt. Je besser die Variablen das zu erforschende Phänomen abbilden, desto aussagekräftigere Ergebnisse lassen sich durch die nachfolgende, statistische Analyse erzielen.

Tipp: Lass dich von der Arbeit anderer inspirieren und entdecke, wie deine Faktoren in früheren Studien gemessen wurden. Vielfach lassen sich früher erfasste Daten auch für andere (deine) Forschungsfragen verwenden. Dies spielt insbesondere dann eine Rolle, wenn du mit Skalen und Konstrukten arbeitest. Diese werden in der Regel sehr aufwändig entwickelt, getestet und validiert. Ein Prozess, den du im Rahmen deiner Arbeit wahrscheinlich nur schwer nachbilden kannst.

Schritt 2 – Formuliere eine allgemeine Hypothese

Eine Hypothese drückt stets eine vermutete Wirkungsbeziehung zwischen i.d.R. zwei ausgewählten Variablen dar. Dabei handelt es bei einer Variablen um eine unabhängige und bei der anderen um eine abhängige Variable. Zur Erinnerung: Die unabhängige Variable ist die Variable, von der angenommen wird, dass sie Auswirkungen auf die abhängige Variable hat.

Es ist für diesen Schritt nicht wichtig, besonders präzise oder detaillierte Formulierungen für die Variable zu finden. Wichtig ist aber, dass klar definiert ist, welche der beiden Variablen die abhängige und welche die unabhängige Variable ist!

Zwei Aspekte sind für die Hypothesenbildungen wichtig:

  • Pro Hypothese darf es nur eine abhängige Variable geben. Solltest du mehr abhängige Variable haben, gilt es nachzubessern. In den häufigsten Fällen kannst du das Problem dadurch lösen, dass du für jede der abhängigen Variablen eine eigene Hypothese formulierst.
  • Jede Hypothese sollte auch nur eine unabhängige Variable enthalten. Es gibt zwar Fälle, in denen auch zwei oder mehr Variablen sinnvoll sind, aber dies ist nur dann sinnvoll, wenn du ausdrücklich nach bestimmten Wirkungszusammenhängen zwischen mehreren unabhängigen Variablen suchen. Überlege dir gut, ob dies auf deinen Fall wirklich zutrifft. Viel öfter wird es fälschlich nur als bequemer angesehen, mehrere Hypothesen in einer zu bündeln. Tatsächlich führt dies aber zur Ergebnisunklarheit.

Schritt 3 – Bestimme die Wirkungsrichtung deiner Hypothese

Es ist üblich zwischen ungerichteten Hypothesen und gerichteten Hypothesen zu unterscheiden. Die allgemeinen Hypothesen, die du in Schritt 2 entwickelt hast, sind ungerichtete Hypothesen. Zur Erinnerung: Eine ungerichtete Hypothese besagt, dass eine Variable die andere Variable auf irgendeine Weise beeinflusst, sie besagt aber nicht, auf welche Weise dies geschieht. In diesem Schritt gilt es nun, die genaue Wirkungsrichtung deiner Hypothese zu bestimmen, d.h. deine Hypothese soll genau beschreiben, wie die unabhängige Variable die abhängige Variable beeinflusst.

Auch wenn es Forschungsprojekte gibt, in denen ungerichtete Hypothesen ausreichen, so sind gerichtete Hypothese fast immer die bessere Wahl. Falls deine Theorie und /oder die zugrundlegende Literatur eine Grundlage dafür bieten, nutze die Gelegenheit, denn gerichtete Hypothesen haben eine deutlich höhere Informationskraft als ungerichtete. Dein Forschungsprojekt gewinnt deshalb an Gewicht, wenn es dir gelingt, gerichtete Hypothesen aufzustellen.

Schritt 4 – Stelle die Testbarkeit deiner Hypothesen sicher

Die in deiner Hypothese dargestellte Wirkungsbeziehung muss in der realen Welt getestet werden, sie muss also beobachtbar und zumindest indirekt messbar sein. Falls dies nicht gewährleistet ist, muss die Hypothese unbedingt noch einmal überarbeitet werden.

Folgende beiden Indikatoren eignen sich gut, die Testbarkeit deiner Hypothesen zu überprüfen:

  • Lege pro Hypothese genau die Grundgesamtheit (der Personen oder Dinge) fest, über die du neue Erkenntnisse erlangen willst.
  • Stelle für jede deiner Hypothesen eine sogenannte Nullhypothese auf. Deine bisherigen Hypothesen beinhalteten immer genau die Annahme, die dich eigentlich interessiert. Die Nullhypothese hingegen steht für die Annahme, die du widerlegen willst.

Formuliere also die Annahme, die du wiederlegen möchtest. Gehe dabei genauso sorgfältig vor, wie bei deinen ursprünglichen Hypothesen. Wenn du die Grundgesamtheit und Nullhypothese genau benennen kannst, dann bist du auf einem guten Weg.

Schritt 5 – Formuliere und bezeichne deine Hypothesen professionell

Alle Formulierungen der Hypothesen werden zunächst noch einmal überarbeitet und weiter konkretisiert. Als Faustregel gilt dabei: Formuliere den Wirkungszusammenhang zwischen abhängiger und unabhängiger Variable so detailliert wie nötig und so einfach wie möglich. Abschließend nummerierst du deine Hypothesen systematisch durch. Jede Hypothese wird mit dem Buchstaben „H“, einer Zahl sowie einem Doppelpunkt gekennzeichnet (z.B. „H1:, H2:, H3:, …“).

Zusammenfassung

In diesem Guide haben wir dir einige wichtige Tipps zur Formulierung von Hypothesen gegeben. Diese sind als „Best-Practice“ zu verstehen und können natürlich in besonderen Situationen an dein Forschungsvorhaben angepasst werden. Falls du Hilfe bei der Erstellung deiner Hypothesen benötigst, steht dir unser Statistik Team gerne zur Verfügung.

Eine Hypothese ist eine empirisch überprüfbare Annahme über die Wirkungsbeziehung von zwei oder mehr Faktoren der realen und erfahrbaren Welt. Am Anfang eines jeden Forschungsprojektes stehen, außer einer klaren Fragestellung, die das Forschungsvorhaben leitet, stets auch eine oder mehrere Hypothesen. Erst dadurch kann eine systematische Forschungsarbeit gewährleistet werden.

Übersicht zu Hypothesen

Im Verlauf des Forschungsprojektes gilt es, die Richtigkeit der Hypothesen zu überprüfen. Die Hypothesen müssen also so formuliert sein, dass sie durch eine methodische Sammlung von geeigneten Daten und durch die anschließende systematische Auswertung der Daten auch tatsächlich falsifizierbar sind. Das heißt, die vermuteten Wirkungszusammenhänge der Hypothese sollen sich am Ende als reale Wirkungszusammenhänge erweisen und als plausible Erklärung für beobachtete Phänomene dienen.

Es ist also von großer Bedeutung, richtige Hypothesen zu erstellen und dieser wichtigen und komplexen „Vorarbeit“ der Forschung große Aufmerksamkeit und genügend Zeit zu widmen. Hypothesenbildung ist alles andere als eine lästige oder anspruchslose Pflichterfüllung. Gute und qualitativ hochwertige Hypothesenbildung ist eine echte Herausforderung und stellt eine wichtige Voraussetzung für am Ende wirksam nutzbare Ergebnisse dar.

In unseren Workshops und Projektberatungen stellen wir immer wieder fest, dass vielversprechende Studien und Forschungsprojekte bereits in diesem frühen Stadium der Hypothesenbildung ins Schleudern geraten. Auch wenn es uns vielfach durch Improvisationsgeschick und Erfahrung gelingt, Studienvorhaben unserer Kunden trotz mangelhafter Hypothesenbildung vor dem Entgleisen zu bewahren, so bleibt der gelegentliche „Totalschaden“ leider nicht aus.

Falsche Hypothesen können gravierende Folgefehler verursachen. Unbedachte Formulierungen können Hypothesen zu nicht überprüfbaren Theoriesackgassen werden lassen. Aufwendig gesammelte Daten können nichtig werden, weil bei der Hypothesenerstellung unbedacht vorgegangen wurde. Spannende und vielversprechende Forschungsprojekte dürfen nicht an ihren ungenauen oder falschen Hypothesen scheitern. Dies lässt sich recht leicht vermeiden!

In einer kleinen 5-schrittigen Anleitung wollen wir dir deshalb helfen, die größten Hürden bei der eigenständigen Hypothesenbildung zu nehmen. Ziel dieses Guides ist es, dich mit zentralen und realistischen Standards vertraut zu machen, dir pragmatische Lösungswege anzubieten, und dir ein grundlegendes Handwerkszeug für die effiziente Hypothesenbildung zur Verfügung zu stellen:

Schritt 1 – Bestimme die relevanten Variablen frühzeitig

Kläre, für welche Faktoren du dich interessierst. Überlegen dir sorgfältig, wie diese Faktoren am besten mit Daten dargestellt werden können. Lege für die zukünftige statistische Auswertung fest, welcher Faktor durch welche Variable im Datensatz repräsentiert werden soll. Es werden nur diese Faktoren in der statistischen Analyse berücksichtigt. Je besser die Variablen das zu erforschende Phänomen abbilden, desto aussagekräftigere Ergebnisse lassen sich durch die nachfolgende, statistische Analyse erzielen.

Tipp: Lass dich von der Arbeit anderer inspirieren und entdecke, wie deine Faktoren in früheren Studien gemessen wurden. Vielfach lassen sich früher erfasste Daten auch für andere (deine) Forschungsfragen verwenden. Dies spielt insbesondere dann eine Rolle, wenn du mit Skalen und Konstrukten arbeitest. Diese werden in der Regel sehr aufwändig entwickelt, getestet und validiert. Ein Prozess, den du im Rahmen deiner Arbeit wahrscheinlich nur schwer nachbilden kannst.

Schritt 2 – Formuliere eine allgemeine Hypothese

Eine Hypothese drückt stets eine vermutete Wirkungsbeziehung zwischen i.d.R. zwei ausgewählten Variablen dar. Dabei handelt es bei einer Variablen um eine unabhängige und bei der anderen um eine abhängige Variable. Zur Erinnerung: Die unabhängige Variable ist die Variable, von der angenommen wird, dass sie Auswirkungen auf die abhängige Variable hat.

Es ist für diesen Schritt nicht wichtig, besonders präzise oder detaillierte Formulierungen für die Variable zu finden. Wichtig ist aber, dass klar definiert ist, welche der beiden Variablen die abhängige und welche die unabhängige Variable ist!

Zwei Aspekte sind für die Hypothesenbildungen wichtig:

Schritt 3 – Bestimme die Wirkungsrichtung deiner Hypothese

Es ist üblich zwischen ungerichteten Hypothesen und gerichteten Hypothesen zu unterscheiden. Die allgemeinen Hypothesen, die du in Schritt 2 entwickelt hast, sind ungerichtete Hypothesen. Zur Erinnerung: Eine ungerichtete Hypothese besagt, dass eine Variable die andere Variable auf irgendeine Weise beeinflusst, sie besagt aber nicht, auf welche Weise dies geschieht. In diesem Schritt gilt es nun, die genaue Wirkungsrichtung deiner Hypothese zu bestimmen, d.h. deine Hypothese soll genau beschreiben, wie die unabhängige Variable die abhängige Variable beeinflusst.

Auch wenn es Forschungsprojekte gibt, in denen ungerichtete Hypothesen ausreichen, so sind gerichtete Hypothese fast immer die bessere Wahl. Falls deine Theorie und /oder die zugrundlegende Literatur eine Grundlage dafür bieten, nutze die Gelegenheit, denn gerichtete Hypothesen haben eine deutlich höhere Informationskraft als ungerichtete. Dein Forschungsprojekt gewinnt deshalb an Gewicht, wenn es dir gelingt, gerichtete Hypothesen aufzustellen.

Schritt 4 – Stelle die Testbarkeit deiner Hypothesen sicher

Die in deiner Hypothese dargestellte Wirkungsbeziehung muss in der realen Welt getestet werden, sie muss also beobachtbar und zumindest indirekt messbar sein. Falls dies nicht gewährleistet ist, muss die Hypothese unbedingt noch einmal überarbeitet werden.

Folgende beiden Indikatoren eignen sich gut, die Testbarkeit deiner Hypothesen zu überprüfen:

Formuliere also die Annahme, die du wiederlegen möchtest. Gehe dabei genauso sorgfältig vor, wie bei deinen ursprünglichen Hypothesen. Wenn du die Grundgesamtheit und Nullhypothese genau benennen kannst, dann bist du auf einem guten Weg.

Schritt 5 – Formuliere und bezeichne deine Hypothesen professionell

Alle Formulierungen der Hypothesen werden zunächst noch einmal überarbeitet und weiter konkretisiert. Als Faustregel gilt dabei: Formuliere den Wirkungszusammenhang zwischen abhängiger und unabhängiger Variable so detailliert wie nötig und so einfach wie möglich. Abschließend nummerierst du deine Hypothesen systematisch durch. Jede Hypothese wird mit dem Buchstaben „H“, einer Zahl sowie einem Doppelpunkt gekennzeichnet (z.B. „H1:, H2:, H3:, …“).

Zusammenfassung

In diesem Guide haben wir dir einige wichtige Tipps zur Formulierung von Hypothesen gegeben. Diese sind als „Best-Practice“ zu verstehen und können natürlich in besonderen Situationen an dein Forschungsvorhaben angepasst werden. Falls du Hilfe bei der Erstellung deiner Hypothesen benötigst, steht dir unser Statistik Team gerne zur Verfügung.